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Critical Tree House Safety Guidelines

As the weather outside starts to warm up, many parents get the desire to start building a tree house for their children. In order to ensure that your kids stay as safe as possible, you need to really plan ahead to safety. Many parents are not aware of the true dangers of tree houses until they are on their way to the emergency room, but knowing what you are potentially looking at can help you to ensure that you are protecting your children.

Luckily, most tree house accidents are not overly serious. Though there are some that are quite dangerous, and even run the lines of being extremely painful. With most accidents simply resulting in cuts, scrapes, and even bruises, there is always the risk of instead having a broken bone, or other serious injury.

If you are looking to build a tree house you need to keep it low, no more than 10 feet is the recommended height so that you can be sure that the structure is not too high up. This keeps it low enough you can get into the tree house quickly in the event of a disaster, but also ensures that kids can get in and out pretty easily. Much higher up not only increases the risk of injury, but also has the potential to take too long for you to get inside in the event of an emergency.

Carefully check all branches that you are interested in building on to ensure that they are thick enough as well as strong enough to hold the tree house. Remember, when checking strength it is not just the weight of the tree house that must be supported, but also the weight of any children that are in the tree house as well as any toys. This could add up to a significant amount quite quickly if it is not watched and checked carefully.

Another important thing to watch for is to ensure that you have a proper base of mulch around the entire base of the tree that supports the tree house. Recommendations are to have at least nine inches of mulch, and spread this base around the entire perimeter of the tree house and then extend it at least 2 feet to ensure ample coverage. Using other materials such as bark, gravel and sand are not suitable since they are not as cushy and do not help prevent injury as well.

With a careful eye towards safety, you will be able to quickly setup a tree house that your kids can enjoy all summer long, while still ensuring that they are safe. After all, going to the emergency room is never a fun trip during the summer, or even any other time of year.

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The Old Home Supply House in Fort Worth Well Worth a Visit

The Old Home Supply House in Fort Worth is treasure trove of old and not-so-old building materials, home supplies, decorative accessories, and just about anything else you can imagine. Browsing through this architectural salvage shop is a treat, whether you`re looking to buy anything or not.

The treats of The Old Home Supply House are spread out on all four corners of College and Jefferson in the Historic Fairmount District (the official address is 1801 College Ave.), and every inch of the space is needed to contain the myriad products. You`ll find room after room after room jam-packed with such a variety of products it`s almost overwhelming. But don`t get overwhelmed, or give up, because it`s worth it to keep looking.

One building, and the yard surrounding it, contains mostly outdoor and patio-type products such as a gazebo, arbors, fountains, benches, garden balls, planters, and statuary, though the two suits of armor would probably fare better inside than out.

Across the street in an outdoor location you`ll find plumbing supplies such as sinks, toilets, tubs, and pipes, as well as windows, doors, grill and iron work. It`s all just there, waiting for you to discover it, stacked and piled, on the ground and shelves and up against the fence.

That`s part of the fun of The Old Home Supply House: digging through the stacks or piles and coming across something unique or truly beautiful; something you might not have expected to find, and couldn`t find anywhere else.

Doors and windows take up a lot of the space in the buildings that make up The Old Home Supply House. There are narrow and wide, short and tall doors, paneled doors, French doors, glass doors, patio doors, and when I was there, even a couple outhouse doors, and a whole outhouse as well!

Small stained glass panels, as well as mid-sized and large stained glass artwork (likely from a church), are just some of the many, many windows available: others are big, small, square, arched, clear and with color.

And just as doors and windows are in plentiful supply, so are the chandeliers: they`re everywhere. Keep looking up or you`ll miss them, and it would be a real shame to miss them. You`ll find chandeliers large and ornate, small and ornate, silly, colorful, and everything in between.

What else will you find at The Old Home Supply House? Just about anything you could possibly imagine finding in an architectural salvage store. Staircase railings, fireplace mantles, columns, pedestals. Bins and bins and boxes of crystals, hinges, hardware for drawers, cabinets and doors, house numbers, locks, keys. You name it, it`s here.

But that`s still not all. When I was there, there was a collection of old toys and games, lunchboxes, paintings and pictures, knick knacks, signs, and even several things unidentified. Not exactly architectural salvage, but old, pretty interesting, and capable of bringing up a memory or two or three.

When you go to The Old Home Supply House`”and you should definitely go`”give yourself lots of time so that you can really explore, because that`s what it`s all about. Let your inner child in the candy store come out, and revel in this store. You won`t regret it.

You can visit The Old Home Supply House Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 pm, Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.